2013 April

Gender and the Gothic Space Thumbnail

Gender and the Gothic Space

Posted by Deborah Russell on April 29, 2013 in Deborah Russell, Guest Blog tagged with ,

After last week’s blog on the critical category of the ‘female Gothic’, this week I’m going to look at the gendering of genres from a different perspective. After all, twentieth-century critics were not the first to connect gender and genre. Eighteenth-century commentary tends to gender the Gothic, too, and this discourse informs the period’s literature ... I’m interested in how eighteenth-century women writers could manipulate the gendered expectations that surrounded their architectural settings. It seems to me that Gothic architecture invited gendered readings, but that its gendered status was also hugely ambivalent. That ambivalence was then open to exploitation.

Generic Restrictions and the ‘Female Gothic’ Thumbnail

Generic Restrictions and the ‘Female Gothic’

Posted by Deborah Russell on April 22, 2013 in Deborah Russell, Guest Blog tagged with , , ,

I’ve been thinking about genre lately – about the boundaries of the Gothic genre as a whole and about the ongoing currency of definitions of the ‘female Gothic’ in particular. I have never been especially worried about whether any given text met enough Gothic criteria to ‘count’ as a Gothic novel, but the question of generic definitions is one I’m used to answering. And I have always hated the category of the ‘female Gothic’, for all the usual reasons about its tendency to encourage ahistorical gender essentialism. Overall, I have a strong sense that over-reliance on generic demarcations is confining, but I remain curious as to whether this is countered by the usefulness of such classification.

CFP: Visions of Egypt, Hull, September 6th and 7th Thumbnail

CFP: Visions of Egypt, Hull, September 6th and 7th

Posted by Matt Foley on April 19, 2013 in Blog tagged with ,

Visions of Egypt: Literature and Culture from the Nineteenth Century to the Present An International and Interdisciplinary Conference 6-7 September 2013 Venues: History Centre, Hull (6 September), University of Hull (7 September) Keynote Speakers: Dr Sahar El Mougy, Cairo University Dr Joann Fletcher and Dr Stephen Buckley, University of York (to be confirmed) Professor William Hughes, Bath Spa University Professor Roger Luckhurst, Birkbeck, University of London Professor Susan Pearce, University  of Leicester In Bram Stoker’s The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903) an Egyptologist,

The 18th-Century Gothick Symposium: 7 August 2013, Oxford Thumbnail

The 18th-Century Gothick Symposium: 7 August 2013, Oxford

Posted by Matt Foley on April 18, 2013 in Blog, News tagged with ,

The 18th-Century Gothick Symposium: 7 August 2013, University of Oxford The Gothick Revival in eighteenth-century Britain is a multi-faceted phenomenon, simultaneously liminal and mainstream, historical and modern, whimsical and serious. This one-day symposium seeks to explore the revival’s many dimensions. Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers that address any aspect of the revival, and may include: art architecture interiors furniture antiquarianism history literature medievalism patronage politics restoration sexuality Please email 250-word proposals to the symposium organ

“Much Too Terrible for Representation”: Matthew Lewis’s The Captive Thumbnail

“Much Too Terrible for Representation”: Matthew Lewis’s The Captive

Posted by Deborah Russell on April 15, 2013 in Deborah Russell, Guest Blog tagged with

Matthew Lewis, author of The Monk (1796), was never one to shy away from sensationalism. When the Covent Garden Theatre staged his monodrama The Captive on 22 March 1803, however, even Lewis agreed that he had gone too far. Despite the fact that theatre manager Thomas Harris was willing to stage it again, Lewis withdrew the piece. His letters describe the problem: “when it was about half over a Man fell into convulsions in the Boxes; Presently after a Woman fainted away in the Pit; and when the curtain dropped, two or three more of the spectators went into hysterics..."

Twisted Tales of Cannibalism Event, Manchester, April 24th Thumbnail

Twisted Tales of Cannibalism Event, Manchester, April 24th

Posted by Matt Foley on April 10, 2013 in Blog, News tagged with , ,

Some exciting news for those in the Manchester area! David McWilliam and Hannah Priest are now offering tickets for their Twisted Tales of Cannibalism event. All the details of what looks to be a lively and interesting line-up of readings can be found on the flyer below.  Free tickets can be reserved directly from their website: http://cannibals-eorg.eventbrite.co.uk/#

Review: The Classic Horror Stories of H.P. Lovecraft, ed. Roger Luckhurst Thumbnail

Review: The Classic Horror Stories of H.P. Lovecraft, ed. Roger Luckhurst

Posted by James Campbell on April 08, 2013 in Reviews tagged with , , , ,

Lovecraft, H.P.  The Classic Horror Stories.  Ed. Roger Luckhurst.  Oxford University Press.  9 May 2013.  Hardback / Kindle. (Since this review refers to the Kindle e-book edition, I apologise in advance for the lack of page references.) Out this May from Oxford University Press, The Classic Horror Stories of H.P. Lovecraft – edited by Roger Luckhurst of Birkbeck College, University of London – collects nine of the most significant entries in Lovecraft’s ‘Cthulhu Mythos.’  By equating ‘classic’ with ‘Cthulhu’ the book takes a firm but justifiable stance towards t

Review: Luke Thurston’s Literary Ghosts from the Victorians to Modernism: The Haunting Interval Thumbnail

Review: Luke Thurston’s Literary Ghosts from the Victorians to Modernism: The Haunting Interval

Posted by Matt Foley on April 05, 2013 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , , , , , ,

Luke Thurston, 2012. Literary Ghosts from the Victorians to Modernism: The Haunting Interval (Abingdon: Routledge) Luke Thurston’s Literary Ghosts from the Victorians to Modernism: The Haunting Interval (2012) is a timely addition to the established literature on literary haunting. Throughout, the monograph posits that a host/guest dynamic is central to the function of the ghostly in a selection of short stories and novels from the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. The antagonistic dynamic that Thurston persuasively argues for is between narratives as hosts - often at first

April Films Thumbnail

April Films

Posted by Kelly Gardner on April 02, 2013 in Blog, News tagged with , ,

Cinemas across the UK are in for a treat this month, with the release of a few highly anticipated films, fans of horror and science fiction will not be disappointed. Dark Skies “From the makers of Insidious and Paranormal Activity” seems to be a tagline attached to many horror movies recently, but this one veers away from demonic possession and instead posits the “supernatural” occurrences on aliens. Directed by Scott Stewart and starring Keri Russell and Josh Hamilton, Dark Skies is a sci-fi horror about an American family whose life is thrown into turmoil after a sequence o