2012 September

Twisted Tales Presents….DARK CONSPIRACIES Thumbnail

Twisted Tales Presents….DARK CONSPIRACIES

Posted by Dale Townshend on September 25, 2012 in News tagged with ,

Following on from the success of their previous events, Twisted Tales will host 'Dark Conspiracies', an evening of readings and stimulating discussion, on Tuesday 23 October, 7-9:30 pm, at Halton Lea Library, Runcorn.  Ramsey Campbell, Simon Bestwick and Stephen McGeagh are due to read from their work, and the event will end off with a Q&A session and book-signing.   Tickets are free, but must be booked in advance from paranormalweel at gmail dot com.  For further information, see the Facebook link here.

Ramsey Campbell interviewed by David McWilliam Thumbnail

Ramsey Campbell interviewed by David McWilliam

Posted by David McWilliam on September 24, 2012 in Interviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Just in my own stuff I’ve moved from imitating Lovecraft to a more contemporary style of psychological horror (a trajectory Robert Bloch’s career also described) and tried to bring the supernatural tale up to my own date (as Fritz Leiber, another author influenced early in his career by HPL, magnificently did). Every so often I make a bid to scale the heights of awe that Blackwood and Machen’s greatest tales occupy. And maybe I’ve even discovered my own little niche in the genre, which I’d call comedy of paranoia. To sum up, I haven’t discovered the limits of the field, and I doubt I will.

CFP: Day of the Dead Thumbnail

CFP: Day of the Dead

Posted by Dale Townshend on September 22, 2012 in Uncategorized tagged with ,

DAY OF THE DEAD: “Monsters, Ghosts, Devils, & Orishas in Latin American & Peninsular Literature, Film, and Music” Deadline: November 1st, 2012 We welcome papers of 15 to 30 pages, notes and works cited included, that represent a critical study of these topics in Latin American & Spanish film, literature, and music. Hispanet is an online journal sponsored by The Foreign Language Program of Florida Memorial University. The deadline for submission is November 1st, 2012. Suggested topic headings include but are not limited to: Fragmented or Monstrous Bodies The She-Devil Re

Benjamin Poole’s SAW, Reviewed by Xavier Aldana Reyes Thumbnail

Benjamin Poole’s SAW, Reviewed by Xavier Aldana Reyes

Posted by Xavier Aldana Reyes on September 11, 2012 in Uncategorized tagged with

Although James Rose’s timely Beyond Hammer: British Horror Cinema Since 1970 appeared in 2009, Auteur Publishing does not generally specialise in horror publications. This is why the Devil’s Advocates series is such an exciting event: milestones in the genre are the subject of individual books that explore exhaustively their different themes and concerns, and even the controversies surrounding them. With volumes on Let the Right One In (Tomas Alfredson, 2008) and Witchfinder General (Michael Reeves, 1968) now readily available, the prospect of a specialised issue on Saw (James Wan, 2004)

CFP: International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, March 2013. Thumbnail

CFP: International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, March 2013.

Posted by Dale Townshend on September 03, 2012 in News tagged with ,

The 34th International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts Fantastic Adaptations, Transformations, and Audiences March 20-24, 2013 Marriott Orlando Airport Hotel When the French first translated Dante, the Italians responded with the now-common saying, “traduttore, traditore” (translator, traitor). Today, many view adaptation with similar distrust—a modern version of the Italian aphorism might be “adapter, adulterer”—but recent adaptation studies tend to concern themselves less with issues of fidelity and more with questions of quality. Texts and their adaptations

Live at the Witch Trials Thumbnail

Live at the Witch Trials

Posted by Gary Farnell on September 03, 2012 in Dr Gary Farnell, Guest Blog tagged with

Live at the Witch Trials The Fall’s debut album in 1979 – Live at the Witch Trials – is neither live, nor is it ‘at the witch trials’. Given their staunch, not to say curmudgeonly regionalist northernism we can be sure that it is the famous 1612 Lancashire witch trials that is the reference here. What is implied is that the Fall’s music – ‘unpleasant’, scabrous and repetitive, proletarian, ragged and black-humoured – is alive with the drives emanating from that truly dark past. Their sonic world often has the ring to it of a type of haunted-house Gothicism. The witch