2011 July

Anne Rice and The Wolf Gift Thumbnail

Anne Rice and The Wolf Gift

Posted by Glennis Byron on July 29, 2011 in News tagged with ,

Anne Rice is apparently writing a werewolf book - The Wolf Gift.

Teaching A-Level Gothic Thumbnail

Teaching A-Level Gothic

Posted by Hannah Priest on July 26, 2011 in Dr Hannah Priest, Guest Blog tagged with , , ,

This post explores some of the frustrations I have had when working with pupils who are sitting a particular A-Level English Literature exam, which contains a module entitled ‘Elements of the Gothic’. It is intended to provoke discussion, but I apologise if it veers towards polemic. I should also note that it is a criticism of a syllabus – not of teaching practice and method.

News from Comic-Con Thumbnail

News from Comic-Con

Posted by Glennis Byron on July 23, 2011 in News tagged with , , , , ,

A trailer for John Cusack's Edgar Allan Poe film was shown at Comic-Con yesterday. The film is described as  Seven meets From Hell. Director James McTeigue says 'The serial killer in Seven used the seven deadly sins, ours uses the works of Edgar Allen Poe'. Here's the official synopsis: "In this gritty thriller, Edgar Allen Poe (John Cusack, Being John Malkovich) joins forces with a young Baltimore detective (Luke Evans, Immortals) to hunt down a mad serial killer who's using Poe's own works as the basis in a string of brutal murders. When a mother and daughter are found brutally murdered

Faber Finds republishing neo-gothic of Emma Tennant: advance sneak preview of preface Q&A Thumbnail

Faber Finds republishing neo-gothic of Emma Tennant: advance sneak preview of preface Q&A

Posted by Glennis Byron on July 21, 2011 in Blog, Interviews tagged with , , , , ,

Faber Finds, a special imprint that brings neglected books back into print, is about to reissue two novels by Emma Tennant.

What’s Wrong With Sparkly Vampires? Thumbnail

What’s Wrong With Sparkly Vampires?

Posted by Hannah Priest on July 20, 2011 in Dr Hannah Priest, Guest Blog tagged with , , ,

In my previous post on this blog, I credited Stephenie Meyer with helping to create a new sub-genre of speculative fiction: YA paranormal romance. Today, I would like to consider one of her other, somewhat more controversial, creations: the sparkly vampire. When Twilight’s Edward Cullen walks in the sunshine, his skin glitters as though covered in precious gemstones. Little about the Twilight novels evokes such a vehement response – from both readers and non-readers alike – as the vampire that sparkles. But what is it that is making vampire fans so angry?

Forthcoming Gothic books

Posted by Glennis Byron on July 19, 2011 in News tagged with

Here's a few books forthcoming in the next year to look forward to. All descriptions from Amazon.uk. Offers of reviews from suitably qualified postgraduates very welcome.

The New Vampires?: The Rise of the Fallen Angel Thumbnail

The New Vampires?: The Rise of the Fallen Angel

Posted by Hannah Priest on July 17, 2011 in Dr Hannah Priest, Guest Blog tagged with , , , ,

Since the 2005 release of Stephenie Meyer's Twilight, the genre of young adult paranormal romance has, to put it mildly, flourished. Meyer's work is credited by some as creating (or at least cementing the creation of) a new genre – the YA dark romance. As many reviewers and critics have commented (grumbled?), vampires have become ubiquitous.

IGA conference, Heidelberg Thumbnail

IGA conference, Heidelberg

Posted by Glennis Byron on July 14, 2011 in News tagged with ,

The programme for this year's IGA conference at Heidelberg is now available on the conference website.

Patrick McGrath Interviewed by Neil McRobert Thumbnail

Patrick McGrath Interviewed by Neil McRobert

Posted by Neil McRobert on July 13, 2011 in Blog, Interviews, McGrath Symposium tagged with ,

Patrick McGrath was born in London in 1950 but has lived primarily in New York since 1981. As the son of the medical superintendent of Broadmoor Hospital for the criminal insane, it is perhaps unsurprising that McGrath has grown to be one of the most perceptive detailers of human psychology in contemporary fiction.

Sue Zlosnik, Patrick McGrath Thumbnail

Sue Zlosnik, Patrick McGrath

Posted by Neil McRobert on July 13, 2011 in Blog, McGrath Symposium, Reviews tagged with , ,

Considering his status in the contemporary Gothic, Patrick McGrath’s fiction has garnered remarkably little scholarly criticism. His was the final entry in Chris Baldick’s 1992 collection of Gothic tales, suggesting that McGrath may well be the future of the genre. In the intervening years...