2008 March

The changing faces of our favourite villains Thumbnail

The changing faces of our favourite villains

Posted by on March 30, 2008 in Blog tagged with

What's driving the constant reinventions?

The Wronged Woman Continued

Posted by Colette Balmain on March 28, 2008 in Dr Colette Balmain, Guest Blog tagged with

  Last time I mentioned the two most archetypical stories, price embedded within popular mythology and folklore that are representative of the wronged/suffering woman who is the central character in Edo Gothic. We saw a permutation on the first, that of Oiwa, in my discussion of The Ghost Story of Yotsuya. I argued that her suffering, like the suffering of all female protagonists in Edo Gothic, functions to complete the story within the concept of mono-no-aware as identified by Kawaii in her discussion of Japanese fairy tales. These tales are therefore inherently tragedies, based around

Reading Group: Clive Barker’s Mister B. Gone

Posted by Glennis Byron on March 27, 2008 in Blog tagged with

Post by Ada Lovelace

Funerary/Bereavement Photography Thumbnail

Funerary/Bereavement Photography

Posted by Glennis Byron on March 15, 2008 in Blog tagged with

Changing attitudes to death or the same old story?

English Studies Seminars

Posted by admin on March 11, 2008 in News tagged with

Gina Wisker discusses Postcolonial Gothic

The Wronged Woman

Posted by Colette Balmain on March 08, 2008 in Dr Colette Balmain, Guest Blog tagged with

As I mentioned in my last posting, Edo Gothic can be defined in terms of specific character types. The central characters are the deceitful Samurai (often as a ronin, that is a masterless Samurai) and the wronged woman, who suffers at the hands of the male antagonist.  The woman's suffering is key to the genre, and as I suggested is connected to what Kawaii identifies as a key feature in Japanese fairy tales, the sense of 'mono-no-aware', a sense of transitory nature of life and sadness connected to a wider understanding of beauty (or awe), an aesthetic which is completed wh

Edo Gothic – A definition

Posted by Colette Balmain on March 03, 2008 in Dr Colette Balmain, Guest Blog tagged with

The term ‘Edo Gothic’ is one that I adopted in my forthcoming book, malady Introduction to Japanese Horror Film (EUP: 2008) to describe a sub-genre of the Japanese film, pilule which was at its height from the late 1950s until the early 1970s. Key films are Tales of Ugetsu (Ugetsu monogatari, Kenji Mizoguchi: 1953), Ghost Story of Yotsuya (Tokaido Yotsuya kaidan, Nobuo Nakagawa: 1959) and Hellish Love (Seidan botan-dôrô, Chusei Sone: 1972). In my book, I define ‘Edo Gothic’ in the following terms: ‘Edo Gothic films were traditional and tended to rein

New Guest Blog: Edo Gothic

Posted by admin on March 03, 2008 in News tagged with

Now being posted by Dr. Colette Balmain