Mandeville and the Gothic Mode Thumbnail

Mandeville and the Gothic Mode

Posted by Richard Gough Thomas on September 30, 2014 in Richard Gough Thomas tagged with , , ,

I often claim Mandeville, A Tale of the Seventeenth Century (1817) as Godwin’s most gothic novel. The author’s fourth major novel, Mandeville was a return to fiction after more than a decade of biographies and writing for children. Inspiration came from a number of places: in the preface Godwin cites Charles Brockden Brown’s Wieland (1798) and Joanna Baillie’s play, De Monfort (1798) as formative influences, but the novel’s setting was probably a result of the author’s immersion in Civil War-era culture during the writing of Lives of Edward and John Philips, Nephews and Pupils of M

William Godwin’s Fleetwood: a full and proper madness Thumbnail

William Godwin’s Fleetwood: a full and proper madness

Posted by Richard Gough Thomas on September 29, 2014 in Richard Gough Thomas tagged with , ,

I would argue that Godwin’s third novel, Fleetwood: or, the New Man of Feeling (1805), is principally an attack on a Rousseauvian idea of education. Rousseau advocates teaching children through the events that occur around them. When these prove inadequate, Rousseau continues, the tutor should secretly conspire to create situations that should prove instructive. Godwin called Émile ‘a series of tricks, a puppet-show exhibition’ (The Enquirer, p.106). Reading both Godwin’s essays on education in The Enquirer (1797) and Fleetwood side-by-side, the author clearly argues that while child-

Paul Finch, Interviewed by Neil McRobert Thumbnail

Paul Finch, Interviewed by Neil McRobert

Posted by Neil McRobert on September 24, 2014 in Interviews, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , , , , ,

        Following a career in the police force, Paul Finch has experienced huge success with the publication of the Mark ‘Heck’ Heckenburg series of detective thrillers. Beginning with Stalkers in 2013 the series as already yielded three further novels. In addition to this recent mainstream success, Paul is also the author of an impressive array of historical, speculative and ‘weird’ fiction. He was awarded a British Fantasy Award for his short story “Aftershock” and his short novel Cape Wrath was shortlisted for a Bram Stoker Award in 2002. Pa

Review of ‘Selling the Splat Pack: The DVD Revolution and the American Horror Film’, by Mark Bernard. Thumbnail

Review of ‘Selling the Splat Pack: The DVD Revolution and the American Horror Film’, by Mark Bernard.

Posted by Glenn Ward on September 22, 2014 in Glenn Ward, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Mark Bernard Selling the Splat Pack: The DVD Revolution and the American Horror Film Edinburgh University Press, 2014 Reviewed by Glenn Ward An eminent horror film critic once told me that many low-budget, high-gore contemporary American genre movies look as if they are “made by assholes”. I think he meant that the films, like many of their grating protagonists, were brash, crude and motivated by a juvenile wish to offend; to that extent, the on-screen Twenty-Something irritants might sometimes be projections of the filmmaker’s personality. Not wanting to get into a leng

Beware of the Mexican Dracula! Thumbnail

Beware of the Mexican Dracula!

Posted by Gabriel Eljaiek-Rodriguez on September 18, 2014 in Blog, Gabriel A. Eljaiek-Rodriguez tagged with

“They have fangs, and they die when you stab them in the heart, so I’m going to go out on a limb here and say Mexican Dracula”. This is the accurate guess that Seth Gecko, one of the main characters of From Dusk Till Down: The Series, shares with his group of fellow survivors of the attack on the nightclub Titty Twister. This 2014 version – developed for television by Robert Rodriguez himself and based on his 1996 film – reunites viewers with the Gecko brothers, the Fuller family, and the vampires they encounter on the Mexican border, delving deeper into their stories and providing s

The Three Dungeons of St. Leon Thumbnail

The Three Dungeons of St. Leon

Posted by Richard Gough Thomas on September 16, 2014 in Richard Gough Thomas tagged with , ,

St. Leon, A Tale of the Sixteenth Century (1799) is the second of Godwin’s major novels. Unlike the relatively down-to-earth narrative of Caleb Williams, St. Leon is a story of the fantastic. The disgraced noble of the title is entrusted with the secrets of alchemy; able to create gold seemingly from nothing and to preserve his youth eternally, through the application of formulae taught to him by a mysterious stranger. Despite the protagonist’s best intentions, unlimited wealth brings him more grief than happiness. St. Leon’s efforts to help others are invariably stymied or perverted, ei

CFP: Eating Otherwise, Lancaster University, 28th February and 1st March 2015 Thumbnail

CFP: Eating Otherwise, Lancaster University, 28th February and 1st March 2015

Posted by Matt Foley on September 15, 2014 in News tagged with , ,

Eating Otherwise: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on Food and Culture. 28th February - 1st March 2015 Lancaster University, Department of English and Creative Writing contact email: eatingotherwise.conference@gmail.com We are pleased to invite 250 word abstract proposals for papers or panels for the two-day interdisciplinary symposium on food and culture titled 'Eating Otherwise'. The conference will be held at Lancaster University, Department of English & Creative Writing on the 28th of February and 1st of March 2015. The main areas of investigation include but are not limited to: 

William Godwin: the Irrational, the Dark and the Weird Thumbnail

William Godwin: the Irrational, the Dark and the Weird

Posted by Richard Gough Thomas on September 05, 2014 in Guest Blog, Richard Gough Thomas tagged with ,

William Godwin is frequently a name mentioned in passing by Gothic scholars, usually as a way to place some context on the life of Mary Shelley. Similarly, it’s not unusual to see Romanticists make passing reference to the ‘Gothic elements’ or ‘Gothic style’ of Godwin’s fiction. There’s value in either kind of statement, but Godwin’s relevance to the Gothic fiction of the early 1800s is under-interrogated. Within the field of Godwin scholarship itself, attention has mainly focused on the author’s politics and on his relationships with other writers – Wollstonecraft, Coler

Review of Matthew Gibson’s The Fantastic and European Gothic: History, Literature and the French Revolution Thumbnail

Review of Matthew Gibson’s The Fantastic and European Gothic: History, Literature and the French Revolution

Posted by Dale Townshend on August 23, 2014 in Reviews tagged with

The Fantastic and European Gothic: History, Literature and the French Revolution. By Matthew Gibson. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2013. ISBN: 978-0-7083-2572-8 Reviewed by Scott Brewster Matthew Gibson’s study, part of the University of Wales Press Gothic Literary Studies series, examines the development of the fantastic in post-Napoleonic France, an area hitherto paid relatively scant attention by Anglophone critics. Gibson draws on critical work in German and French to restore the reputation of neglected figures such as Charles Nodier and Paul Féval, who deploy the fanta

Why Study the Gothic? Thumbnail

Why Study the Gothic?

Posted by Stephanie Bryant on August 20, 2014 in Blog, Steph Bryant tagged with

On the 24th of July I graduated from Manchester Metropolitan University with a MA in English Studies, specializing in the Gothic. The first half of that title is greeted with a half “congratulations” hovering on the well wishers lips; the latter half is met with a quizzical raising of the eyebrows and the inevitable questions, “ oh, Like Dracula and wearing black?” and so being, in their eyes, defined. The irony of this defined status is that the gothic as a mode is a malleable term that eludes a definitive definition, as most students of the gothic are aware. Whilst studying the Goth