‘It keeps coming back’: Horror in the Gothic novels and plays of David Pinner. Thumbnail

‘It keeps coming back’: Horror in the Gothic novels and plays of David Pinner.

Posted by Dr David Annwn Jones on October 24, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

  I.   There was another screech of lightning. As its electrical bolt detonated in the chest of Jimmy’s corpse, there was a shattering bang. Seconds later, the farmer’s hanging body was enveloped in flames, and his fire-envenomed flesh began to crackle like duck’s fat. Then the supporting rope snapped, and Jimmy’s flaming body crashed down onto the oak’s roots. Within moments, the cadaver was transformed into a human bonfire, while from the oak-tree, more falling leaves winnowed down into the rising flames created by the lightning. Momentarily the leaves glowe

Sleeping With the Lights On: The unsettling story of horror by Darryl Jones (2018) Thumbnail

Sleeping With the Lights On: The unsettling story of horror by Darryl Jones (2018)

Posted by Benjamin E. Noad on October 11, 2018 in Blog, Reviews, Uncategorized tagged with

  I want to start this review unprofessionally by making a confession: as a ‘madhouse nerd’, I carry a copy of Roy Porter’s Madness A Brief History (OUP 2002) in my bag for quick reference. This is especially helpful for post-archival walks around Scotland, and it currently sits next to my absinthe spoon (my Gothic version of a Sonic Screwdriver). I am delighted to say that Darryl Jones’ Sleeping With the Lights On is, to me, an equally cherished book. This welcome contribution to horror’s critical bibliography is an extensive resource, though short in length. Sleeping Wi

German Expressionist Cinema: The Modern Gothic and The Uncanny Double Thumbnail

German Expressionist Cinema: The Modern Gothic and The Uncanny Double

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 09, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

  By Jamie Wood   German Expressionist cinema exudes Gothic revival motifs: fairytale motifs, angular exteriors, claustrophobic interiors’[1] as well as for humanoids, vampires, automata, doubles, including other creatures hovering between man and beast and man and machine and living in the twilight zone of power and madness.’[2] In Thomas Elsaesser’s Weimar Cinema and After: Germany’s Historical Imaginary, ‘Weimar cinema came to epitomize a country: ‘twentieth-century Germany, uneasy with itself and troubled by a modernity that was to bring yet more appallin

Verónica: Something horrible for the weekend Thumbnail

Verónica: Something horrible for the weekend

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 05, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

  Just a note to say that Stirling Gothicist Professor Ann Davies will be introducing Verónica, the latest film by Paco Plaza ([REC]), to be screened in both Edinburgh and Glasgow as part of the Edinburgh Spanish Film Festival this weekend. Edinburgh: Filmhouse, Lothian Road, Edinburgh, Sunday 7 October 20:20 Glasgow: Glasgow Film Theatre, Rose St, Glasgow, Monday 15 October 20:15   For further details: https://www.edinburghspanishfilmfestival.com/en/films/veronica/ https://www.ed.ac.uk/files/atoms/files/esff_programme_2018.pdf  

What Lies Beneath: Neoliberalism, Façades and Truth in Aleš Šteger’s Absolution Thumbnail

What Lies Beneath: Neoliberalism, Façades and Truth in Aleš Šteger’s Absolution

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 03, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

  By Kate Walker   In the introduction to New Directions in 21st Century Gothic, Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Donna Lee Brien discuss the malleability of the term 'Gothic,' and its continual transformation into disparate narrative forms and fictional disciplines.  Whilst recognising how 'contemporary Gothic is never too far removed from its origins and its narrative pasts,'[1]  they simultaneously explore how the gothic has also become increasingly popularised and commercialised within contemporary contexts.  These perspectives led to the development of transnational gothic a

The “Post Racial Lie” and Horror Movie Expectations in Get Out Thumbnail

The “Post Racial Lie” and Horror Movie Expectations in Get Out

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 03, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

By Sarah Treanor   Get Out (2017) has been hailed by the media as “the satirical horror movie we’ve been waiting for” (Edelstein). The fact that we’ve been waiting for it implies not only that it is something we have not seen before, but also that it has something culturally and socially necessary to say. Peele has said that he “wrote the movie primarily during the post racial lie” and, rather than perpetuate this lie, Get Out gives us the idea that “the underside of culture is blood, torture, death and horror” (Jameson, 57). This blog will discuss how the cultur

Welcome to Rapture: The influence of Metropolis on BioShock’s dystopian Gothic City Thumbnail

Welcome to Rapture: The influence of Metropolis on BioShock’s dystopian Gothic City

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 03, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with

  By Michael Andrews   It is 2007. I’m twelve years old—only six years shy of BioShock’s PEGI 18 rating. At midnight I plug in a borrowed XBOX 360 and insert the disc. How scary can a game be, they’re meant to be fun after all? Approximately six minutes and fifty-five seconds into my first journey through Rapture, a terrifying, unseen voice says from the rafters ‘I’ll wrap you in a sheet’. I turn off the console and do not return to BioShock for another few years. 2K Games and director Ken Levine’s 2007 magnum opus BioShock[1][2] is still, in 2018, thr

The Handmaid’s Tale as Dystopian Gothic Thumbnail

The Handmaid’s Tale as Dystopian Gothic

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 03, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

By Egon Cools   As an effort towards new criticism of Gothic works, this blog series addresses Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale – a novel published in 1986, but holding more relevance and significance today than ever before. This first part contextualises The Handmaid’s Tale through an introduction to dystopian fiction and the genre’s links to the Gothic, and also relates the novel to female oppression as presented in ‘The Yellow Wallpaper’. The second entry in this series will address the resurgence in popularity of The Handmaid’s Tale in recent years, and

‘he loved to have the house to himself’:  Edge of terror, the animations of Brian Coldrick Thumbnail

‘he loved to have the house to himself’: Edge of terror, the animations of Brian Coldrick

Posted by Dr David Annwn Jones on September 28, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with

    In the muggy days of British summer 2018, our family has frequently been leaving windows open all over the house. Recently, working alone upstairs, I heard a terrific bang echoing from the rooms below. I jumped, decided it must be a strong breeze, settled down and then uncharacteristically shivered again. Admittedly, I had an excuse for this reaction. I had been viewing the art-work and animations of Brian Coldrick. For in Coldrick’s images, the house is never at peace; there is something waiting or stirring in the shadows behind the subject who feels at home. In his

CfP: 40th International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts (ICFA) Thumbnail

CfP: 40th International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts (ICFA)

Posted by Timothy Jones on August 28, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with ,

March 13-17, 2019 at the Marriott Orlando Airport Hotel. The deadline for submitting proposals is October 31, 2018. Please join us for ICFA 40, March 13-17, 2019, when our theme will be “Politics and Conflict.” We welcome papers on the work of: Guest Scholar Mark Bould (Reader, University of the West of England; winner of the SFRA Pilgrim Award; author of several books on sf including Science Fiction: The Routledge Film Guidebook) and Guest Author G. Willow Wilson (winner of a PEN Center award; writer of the Hugo-Award-winning series Ms. Marvel, author of Alif the Unseen). Specul