Review of Matthew Gibson’s The Fantastic and European Gothic: History, Literature and the French Revolution Thumbnail

Review of Matthew Gibson’s The Fantastic and European Gothic: History, Literature and the French Revolution

Posted by Dale Townshend on August 23, 2014 in Reviews tagged with

The Fantastic and European Gothic: History, Literature and the French Revolution. By Matthew Gibson. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2013. ISBN: 978-0-7083-2572-8 Reviewed by Scott Brewster Matthew Gibson’s study, part of the University of Wales Press Gothic Literary Studies series, examines the development of the fantastic in post-Napoleonic France, an area hitherto paid relatively scant attention by Anglophone critics. Gibson draws on critical work in German and French to restore the reputation of neglected figures such as Charles Nodier and Paul Féval, who deploy the fanta

Why Study the Gothic? Thumbnail

Why Study the Gothic?

Posted by Stephanie Bryant on August 20, 2014 in Blog, Steph Bryant tagged with

On the 24th of July I graduated from Manchester Metropolitan University with a MA in English Studies, specializing in the Gothic. The first half of that title is greeted with a half “congratulations” hovering on the well wishers lips; the latter half is met with a quizzical raising of the eyebrows and the inevitable questions, “ oh, Like Dracula and wearing black?” and so being, in their eyes, defined. The irony of this defined status is that the gothic as a mode is a malleable term that eludes a definitive definition, as most students of the gothic are aware. Whilst studying the Goth

“loved with a love that was more than love”: From Poe’s “Annabel Lee” to Nabokov’s Lolita Thumbnail

“loved with a love that was more than love”: From Poe’s “Annabel Lee” to Nabokov’s Lolita

Posted by Janet Chu on August 18, 2014 in Blog, Janet Chu tagged with

     Since its initial publication in 1955, Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita has been renowned (or infamous) for its controversial plot that charts a middle-aged professor Humbert Humbert’s paedophilic infatuation for a 12-year-old girl Dolores Haze, whom the former amorously nicknames Lolita. In constructing the episodes of such a distorted psyche—interestingly and unmistakably—Nabokov intertextually refers to his 19th-century American precursor Edgar Allan Poe’s “Annabel Lee” in naming Humbert’s childhood love as “Annabel Leigh.” Annabel Leigh’s premature death results

Father Dagon Uses Sounds of Lovecraftian Fear Thumbnail

Father Dagon Uses Sounds of Lovecraftian Fear

Posted by Will Connor on August 13, 2014 in Uncategorized tagged with

(Part One is here and Part Two is here) So far the focus of the past two posts has been discussing the parallels between Lovecraft’s use of fear and how he generates this emotion within his reader’s minds and the ways in which Victoria Snaith is attempting to emulate a similar emotive response through various directorial decisions she employs to develop the newest piece for her drama company, Dread Falls Theatre, a show called Father Dagon, based on Lovecraft’s writings. As almost a miniature duplicate of this set of decisions, embedded within the overall performance, is yet another par

Dread Falls Theatre’s Father Dagon Embodies Lovecraftian Fear, con’t Thumbnail

Dread Falls Theatre’s Father Dagon Embodies Lovecraftian Fear, con’t

Posted by Will Connor on August 05, 2014 in Blog, Will Connor tagged with

(to see the first part of this three part post, go here) In this second post on Dread Falls Theatre’s upcoming immersive performance piece, Father Dagon, based on the works of H. P. Lovecraft, I want to further detail the ways in which Victoria Snaith, director of the show and owner of the company, expects to embrace Lovecraft’s sensibilities in a non-traditional performative setting. As mentioned in the previous post, one of Lovecraft’s main threads incorporated throughout many of his works is instilling a sense of fear, both in the reader and the protagonist’s psyche, specifically a

Ann Radcliffe at 250: Gothic and Romantic Imaginations Thumbnail

Ann Radcliffe at 250: Gothic and Romantic Imaginations

Posted by Carly Stevenson on August 05, 2014 in Blog, Carly Stevenson tagged with , , , ,

A review by the University of Sheffield's Gothic Reading Group: Last month marked a special occasion for the history of the Gothic, as the University of Sheffield celebrated Ann Radcliffe’s 250th birthday with the first ever international academic conference dedicated entirely to ‘the great enchantress’ and her works. Ann Radcliffe at 250: Gothic and Romantic Imaginations ran for three days, between the 27th and 29th of June. The event was the result of long-planning and hard work on the part of its chief organisers, The University of Stirling’s Dr. Dale Townshend and Sheffield’s

Review of Elisabeth Bronfen’s Night Passages: Philosophy, Literature, Film Thumbnail

Review of Elisabeth Bronfen’s Night Passages: Philosophy, Literature, Film

Posted by Dale Townshend on August 04, 2014 in Reviews tagged with , ,

Night Passages: Philosophy, Literature, Film. By Elisabeth Bronfen. Trans. Elisabeth Bronfen with David Brenner. New York: Columbia University Press, 2013. ISBN: 978 0 231 14799 6 Reviewed by Scott Brewster Elisabeth Bronfen has long had something of the night about her. So much is apparent from the landmark study Over Her Dead Body (MUP, 1992), whose cover image is Henry Fuseli’s The Nightmare. Fuseli’s phantasmagoric imbrication of fear, imagination and death epitomizes the Gothic and its ambivalent relation to the nocturnal. The woman sprawled on her bed is not dead, but sleepin

Dread Falls Theatre’s Father Dagon Embodies Lovecraftian Fear Thumbnail

Dread Falls Theatre’s Father Dagon Embodies Lovecraftian Fear

Posted by Will Connor on July 29, 2014 in Blog, Will Connor tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,

          H. P. Lovecraft is arguably one of the most important writers of the previous century and remains so today. His works, spanning horror, science fiction, and fantasy, have influenced a large number of prominent authors following fellow writer and fan August Derleth’s adamant insistence that Lovecraft’s works be preserved and widely published. As a result, many tributes, expansions, and interpretations of Lovecraft’s works have been produced in increasing numbers each year to date. Literature is not the only form of media producing Lovecraftian works, either, with the most c

Gothic Networking Day at MMU: a review Thumbnail

Gothic Networking Day at MMU: a review

Posted by rebeccaduncan on July 16, 2014 in News tagged with , , , ,

At about quarter past nine on Saturday 12 July, Shannon Rollins (currently writing an excellent blog series on Steampunk for the International Gothic Association – check it out here: http://www.iga.stir.ac.uk/showblog.php?id=169) and I were walking through Manchester Metropolitan University on our way to the Gothic networking day organised by Linnie Blake and Xavier Aldana Reyes. A group of people had gathered outside the doors to the business school. ‘Is this it?’ I asked. ‘Don’t think so,’ Shannon replied. ‘Not wearing enough black.’ This is one of the things I like about th

Review: “We’re All Infected” Essays on AMC’s The Walking Dead and the Fate of the Human – edited by Dawn Keetley Thumbnail

Review: “We’re All Infected” Essays on AMC’s The Walking Dead and the Fate of the Human – edited by Dawn Keetley

Posted by Kelly Gardner on July 02, 2014 in Reviews tagged with , , ,

  McFarland are adding to their already growing collection of Zombie oriented publications with the recently released “We’re All Infected” Essays on AMC’s The Walking Dead and the Fate of the Human edited by Dawn Keetley.   This edited collection of thirteen original scholarly essays, exhibits a clear sense of structural coherence and critical timeliness. The use of The Walking Dead television series (as well as references to Kirkman’s comic book series) as the central focus of the collection functions as a cohesive theme from which various explorations may div