Review: Women’s Ghost Literature in Nineteenth-century Britain Thumbnail

Review: Women’s Ghost Literature in Nineteenth-century Britain

Posted by Donna Mitchell on May 20, 2016 in Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Women’s Ghost Literature in Nineteenth-century Britain Melissa Edmundson Makala Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2013. ISBN: 978-0-70832-564-3 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Melissa Edmundson Makala begins her study of women’s ghost writing in nineteenth-century Britain by considering the various reasons for its increasing popularity, most notably its ability to function as a subversive means of discussing political and social issues. She notes that the nature of this genre allowed writers to explore the social tensions and inequalities which existed for certain groups without alienati

Review: ‘Reimagining the Gothic: Monsters and Monstrosities’ symposium, 6th May 2016 Thumbnail

Review: ‘Reimagining the Gothic: Monsters and Monstrosities’ symposium, 6th May 2016

Posted by Amy Bride on May 19, 2016 in Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

‘Monster’ is a jointly allusive and ubiquitous term. For gothic scholars, what constitutes monstrosity is a vast and varied spectrum of physical abnormality, genetic hybridity, moral corruption, and everything in between. Yet for almost 200 years perceptions of the gothic monster in the popular imagination have been dominated by Mary Shelley and her life-creating doctor who has transcended literary boundaries to become a cultural icon in his own right. The task of re-analysing the gothic monster, both in conversation and contrast with Shelley’s creation, was that addressed by the ‘Reim

Review: Frankenstein at the Royal Opera House Thumbnail

Review: Frankenstein at the Royal Opera House

Posted by Evan Hayles Gledhill on May 19, 2016 in Evan Hayles Gledhill, Reviews tagged with , , ,

First, a preface. The last time I voluntarily watched a full dance production, it was Edward Scissorhands, and I hated the hedges. I generally plonk myself on the sofa for The Nutcracker at Christmas just for the Cossacks, which is my favourite bit. I am not a traditional dance fan; I tend to only watch a story I have a narrative interest in, otherwise I cherry pick sequences to be enthralled by the marvellous grace and athleticism of the dance. So, this is not a ballet review, it’s a Frankenstein review. I saw the new Liam Scarlett production in the cinema, as I missed out on affordable

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon Thumbnail

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon

Posted by Benjamin E. Noad on May 09, 2016 in Ben Noad, Reviews, Uncategorized tagged with , , , ,

Review: Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon edited by Linnie Blake and Xavier Aldana Reyes (New York and London: I. B. Tauris & Co., 2016) This recent edited collection channels a political urgency that beckons further attention to the stylistics, nuances and cultural significance of global horror cinema. The essays it contains are inspired, richly detailed and are, in a word that may do justice to the entirety of the collection as a whole, haunting. The most immediate effect of this inquiry is realised in Blake and Reyes’s introduction

Writing Britain’s Ruins: Word and Image Thumbnail

Writing Britain’s Ruins: Word and Image

Posted by Peter Lindfield on May 09, 2016 in Blog, Peter Lindfield tagged with , , , , , ,

Ruins were important in the Georgian period — one would, for example, encounter them whilst traversing the British countryside, as is still the case today. Ruins were also a central facet of that great Georgian cultural experience — the Grand Tour of the Continent. As we can see from John Richard’s The Colosseum from 1779, the architectural ruins from antiquity were both of academic and picturesque interest to the spectators in the fore- and middle-ground. This image celebrates the still monumental, though mouldering, colosseum and triumphal arch.     Aristocrats,

Where the Camera can not Take Us: Sounding the Unseeable in Game of Thrones. Thumbnail

Where the Camera can not Take Us: Sounding the Unseeable in Game of Thrones.

Posted by Danielle Hancock on May 06, 2016 in Danielle Hancock, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , , , ,

  Warning: This blog-post contains spoilers for Game of Thrones, Season 6.   Daenerys Targaryen’s dragons are rough to the touch. The plains of Winterfell are swept with fast, sharp winds. A human skull smashes with the same wet burst as a watermelon. I learnt these things, and many more, from listening to Game of Thrones. Mostly, we tend to watch Game of Thrones, and with good reason. The show seldom shies away from graphic detail. Gouged eyes, decapitation, burning children, full frontal nudity  - in the face of all these and more the camera’s gaze never wavers. I

Conference Registration Reminder:  Gothic Feminism, University of Kent Thumbnail

Conference Registration Reminder: Gothic Feminism, University of Kent

Posted by Matt Foley on April 29, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , , , ,

Registration Reminder: Gothic Feminism: The Representation of the Gothic Heroine in Cinema University of Kent   (Registration deadline: 18th May 2016)   Keynote Speaker: Dr Catherine Spooner (Lancaster University) Registration is still open for Gothic Feminism: a conference on cinema's Gothic heroines taking place at the University of Kent (please see conference programme below).   To register, please go to: http://store.kent.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=1&deptid=26&catid=158&prodvarid=207&searchresults=1   The confer

CFP: GANZA’s third biennial conference, January, Auckland Thumbnail

CFP: GANZA’s third biennial conference, January, Auckland

Posted by Matt Foley on April 27, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , , , , ,

Call for Papers Gothic Afterlives: Mutations, Histories, and Returns The Gothic Association of New Zealand and Australia (GANZA) welcomes papers for its third biennial conference, to be held at Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand, on 23-24 January 2017. The conference will be organised in the spirit of the Association. GANZA is interdisciplinary in nature, bringing together scholars, students, teachers and professionals from a number of Gothic disciplines, including literature, film, music, television, fashion, architecture, and other popular culture forms. It is the aim of the

‘The Haunted House in French Culture’, London 19 May Thumbnail

‘The Haunted House in French Culture’, London 19 May

Posted by Matt Foley on April 22, 2016 in Blog, News tagged with , ,

The Haunted House in French Culture 19 May 2016 Room 243, Senate House, University of London Malet Street, London WC1 7HU   The haunted house is a significant Gothic motif in literature, film and television. It can be understood as the domestication of the Gothic, as the older concept of the aristocratic ancestral home becomes more diluted, more nuanced, by the rise of the bourgeois family. The haunted house comes to represent a variety of thematic concepts: it can be read as revealing the fault lines of gender, sexuality and class, as symbolic of hidden trauma, or it can be

“a bit like Serial”: journo-podding and the new sounds of horror Thumbnail

“a bit like Serial”: journo-podding and the new sounds of horror

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 20, 2016 in Blog, Danielle Hancock, Uncategorized tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , ,

  Up until the advent of Serial, I had a hard time explaining my research area to people. “Podcasts”, I’d say. “Pod-what?”, they’d reply. “Podcasts, scary ones. Like Welcome to Nightvale”. “Oh. Yeah, I’ve never heard of that.” There would be an exchange of mutually apologetic smiles, I’d mutter something about it being a bit like radio, and wish I’d stuck with literature studies. Then Serial happened. An off-shoot of NPR’s vastly popular radio programme cum podcast, This American Life,  Serial followed journalist Sarah Koenig’s ongoing, true-life, investi