Fantasy, Fairy Tales and the (Non) Human – Seminar Thumbnail

Fantasy, Fairy Tales and the (Non) Human – Seminar

Posted by Timothy Jones on May 19, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

There's a really interesting looking seminar being organised by the University of Edinburgh's School of Literatures, Languages and Cultures, which could be of interest  - Fantasy, Fairy Tales and the (Non) Human 28th June 2017 2.00-5.00 50 George Square 2.03 Keynote: John Plotz (Brandeis University) ‘World Without Us: The Problem of the Nonhuman in fin-de-siècle Fantasy’ With: Sarah Dunnigan (University of Edinburgh) 'Transfigurations: Hogg and the Spiritualised Fairy Tale' Rebecca Langworthy (University of Aberdeen) ‘The Tales at the Heart of the Tale: Scottish S

Marvin Macy: The Strong Man of Grotesque Power and Heteronormativity Thumbnail

Marvin Macy: The Strong Man of Grotesque Power and Heteronormativity

Posted by Rachel Carden on May 19, 2017 in Blog, Rachel Carden tagged with , , , , ,

In my previous blog, I established Miss Amelia’s café as a place of inclusive community, linked to Mikhail Bakhtin’s conceptualisation of carnivals and their connection to freak shows. I highlighted that the space engendered a sense of community where its occupants’ grotesque physicality and their subversive genders were accepted. This post explores the grotesque power of patriarchy using Foucauldian theory and its resistance to the collapse of dichotomous gender and sexuality binaries in Carson McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951). Justin Edwards and Rune Graulund, i

Review: Contemporary Spanish Gothic Thumbnail

Review: Contemporary Spanish Gothic

Posted by Timothy Jones on May 16, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with

Contemporary Spanish Gothic: A Review Davies, Ann. Contemporary Spanish Gothic. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2016. Reviewed by Rocío Rødtjer   In the article ‘Madrid Has Died’, the author laments that: Madrid has died, like Vienna, Saint Petersburg, Lisbon and Constantinople. There are no longer populations, but one population built or modified according to the layout of Paris and distributed throughout the globe in copies of different sizes Were it not for the disappearance of Constantinople, such an archetypical elegy on the homogenising effects of urba

A Strong Man, a Hermaphrodite and a Hunchbacked Dwarf Walk into a Café: Carnival and Community in McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951) Thumbnail

A Strong Man, a Hermaphrodite and a Hunchbacked Dwarf Walk into a Café: Carnival and Community in McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951)

Posted by Rachel Carden on May 12, 2017 in Blog, Rachel Carden tagged with , , , ,

In my previous blog, I summarised the plot of McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café and aligned it with key genres and tropes to highlight its Gothicism and cultural critique of patriarchy through grotesque tropes. This post uses Bakhtinian theory to situate Miss Amelia’s café as a place of community, a theatrical space of gender performance and bodily oddities, which temporarily succeeds in challenging patriarchy.   The philosopher and literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin’s Rabelais and His world (1965) analyses the work of the Renaissance writer François Rabelais to refocu

Reminder: Gothic Modernisms Thumbnail

Reminder: Gothic Modernisms

Posted by Timothy Jones on May 09, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with ,

A reminder of the forthcoming Gothic Modernisms Conference in June - looks wonderful.   GOTHIC MODERNISMS International Conference: Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, 29-30 June 2017   REGISTRATION NOW OPEN   GOTHIC MODERNISMS: 29 & 30 June, 2017, The Rijksmuseum: A two-day international conference exploring legacies, histories and contested identities of European Gothic/early-modern visual cultures in (global) modernity, in particular in contexts of new fin-de-siècle cultural modernities, modernism, avant-gardes, nationalisms and cosmopolitanisms. More informatio

Carson McCullers and Genre: Female Gothic, American Gothic and the Southern Gothic’s Grotesquerie Thumbnail

Carson McCullers and Genre: Female Gothic, American Gothic and the Southern Gothic’s Grotesquerie

Posted by Rachel Carden on May 05, 2017 in Blog, Rachel Carden tagged with , , , , , ,

Carson McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951) portrays the destructive power of the patriarchal regime.[1] McCullers’ use of grotesquerie brings the marginalised, the androgynous, the deformed and the weird to the forefront of her novella. In doing so, she makes the abnormal normal and the importance of binary distinctions, such as masculine and feminine, gay and straight, breakdown, at least temporarily. We feel compassion for those traditionally omitted from society and power – particularly, the distinctly masculine Miss Amelia – and we mourn the loss of a fleetingly enjoy

Review: Post-Millennial Gothic: Comedy, Romance and the Rise of Happy Gothic Thumbnail

Review: Post-Millennial Gothic: Comedy, Romance and the Rise of Happy Gothic

Posted by Donna Mitchell on April 22, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell, Reviews tagged with , , ,

Post-Millennial Gothic: Comedy, Romance and the Rise of Happy Gothic Catherine Spooner New York: Continuum Publishing Corporation, 2017. ISBN: 978-1-4411-5390-6 Reviewed by Donna Mitchell Spooner’s study begins by bringing the reader’s attention to the fact that funny, romantic, and celebratory aspects of the Gothic text have long been ignored. Focusing on the summer of 2012 as a starting point for the rise of post-millennial Gothic’s popularity in terms of its increasing social and cultural omnipresence, she coins the phrase ‘happy Gothic’ as an umbrella term to describe the

CFP: The Uncanny in Language, Literature and Culture Thumbnail

CFP: The Uncanny in Language, Literature and Culture

Posted by Fanny Lacôte on March 29, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

International Conference 19 August 2017 – London, UK organised by Interdisciplinary Research Foundation and London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research http://uncanny.irf-network.org/ The twentieth-century literature and culture tended to explore and to celebrate subjectivity. But this tendency did not mean the turn to the self, but beyond the self, or as Charles Taylor puts it, “to a fragmentation of experience which calls our ordinary notions of identity into question”.  In his attempts to define the uncanny Freud asserted that it is undoubtedly related to what is frightening

CFP: Rereading Stephen King: Navigating the Intertextual Labyrinth Thumbnail

CFP: Rereading Stephen King: Navigating the Intertextual Labyrinth

Posted by Matt Foley on March 07, 2017 in Blog, News tagged with , , , , ,

Rereading Stephen King: Navigating the Intertextual Labyrinth Kingston University Saturday 11th November 2017 Keynote Speaker: Simon Brown (Kingston University) In Stephen King’s Gothic (2011) John Sears asserts that rereading King represents ‘an exercise in the extension of repetition, in the act of rereading an oeuvre already deeply structured … by its own engagement in the Gothic habit of rereading … To reread King would be to enter … and perhaps to become lost within, a labyrinth of intra- and intertextual relations, an immense and complex textual space’ (2). Sears’s

CFP: Global Fantastika Thumbnail

CFP: Global Fantastika

Posted by Donna Mitchell on February 21, 2017 in Blog, Donna Mitchell tagged with ,

Fantastika Journal Call for Papers for Global Fantastika Edition “Fantastika”, coined by John Clute, is an umbrella term which incorporates the genres of fantasy, science fiction, and horror, but can also include alternative histories, steampunk, young adult fiction, or any other imaginative space. The third annual Fantastika conference focused on productions of Fantastika globally, as well as considering themes of contact across nations and borders within Fantastika. We are now seeking to supplement extended conference papers with other work in order to publish a special edition of F