Review by Danel Olson: The American Imperial Gothic: Popular Culture, Empire, Violence. Thumbnail

Review by Danel Olson: The American Imperial Gothic: Popular Culture, Empire, Violence.

Posted by Dale Townshend on March 02, 2015 in Reviews tagged with

The American Imperial Gothic: Popular Culture, Empire, Violence by Johan Hoglund (Surrey: Ashgate Publishing, 2014). 211pp. ISBN 9781409449546, hardback. Reviewed by Danel Olson Coming one year after his impressive anthology edited with Tabish Khair Transnational and Postcolonial Vampires: Dark Blood (Palgrave, 2013) (which featured new chapters from thirteen Gothic authorities from around the world—and a poem from David Punter), Swedish scholar Johan Hoglund’s latest volume narrows its focus from the world to America in eleven enlightening chapters. As with his former co-edited t

REVIEW:  Modern Mythmakers: 35 Interviews with Horror & Science Fiction Writers and Filmmakers  By Michael McCarty, Crystal Lake Publishing Thumbnail

REVIEW: Modern Mythmakers: 35 Interviews with Horror & Science Fiction Writers and Filmmakers By Michael McCarty, Crystal Lake Publishing

Posted by Tanja Jurković on March 01, 2015 in Reviews tagged with , , , , , , , , , , ,

  We all grew up eagerly absorbing the works of Ray Bradbury, Richard Matheson, John Carpenter and the likes, allowing their words and actions to shape our lives, and our character. They all taught us to appreciate literature, film and art in any other form. We witnessed the birth of the dark and the weird, and we realized that our nightmares can come to life and haunt us through novels, short stories, feature films and representations on the big screen. Modern Mythmakers is a thorough account of life’s works of some of the most famous and legendary writers, directors and actors

Review: Moonrise Falling, by Adrian L. Jawort Thumbnail

Review: Moonrise Falling, by Adrian L. Jawort

Posted by Dale Townshend on February 24, 2015 in Reviews tagged with

Moonrise Falling, by Adrian L. Jawort (Billing: Off the Pass Press, 2014) Reviewed by Dr Gennie Dyson The character of the vampire has been used to highlight societal problems since the nineteenth century; during this period, vampires mirrored the fear of the degenerate and the sexual deviant; in the 1980s they became harbingers of plague in a reflection of fears regarding H.I.V and A.I.D.S. The vampire has also been used as a tool to discuss matters of race and prejudice, such as The Gilda Stories by Jewelle Gomez, concerns close to the heart of Adrian L. Jawort’s Moonrise Falling, focu

Varney – the Forgotten Vampire Thumbnail

Varney – the Forgotten Vampire

Posted by Matt Foley on February 19, 2015 in Blog tagged with , ,

Varney – the Forgotten Vampire By Lauren Owen, Durham University Who is Varney? He is rather overshadowed by other pre-Dracula vampires like Lord Ruthven, the Byronic villain of Polidori’s short story “The Vampyre” (1819), or Carmilla, the dangerously seductive anti-heroine of LeFanu’s 1872 novella of the same name. Varney, the Vampyre was a long-running serial probably written by James Malcolm Rymer between 1845 and 1847. (The work was also associated with Thomas Preskett Prest, who is credited with the authorship of The String of Pearls, the novel which introduced the vill

CFP: Reading Architecture Across the Arts and Humanities Conference Thumbnail

CFP: Reading Architecture Across the Arts and Humanities Conference

Posted by Dale Townshend on February 18, 2015 in News tagged with

Reading Architecture Across the Arts and Humanities An AHRC-Funded Interdisciplinary Conference University of Stirling Saturday 5th December 2015 First Call for Papers The organisers of this one-day multidisciplinary conference seek to solicit proposals for 20-minute papers that consider the creation, expression and representation of architecture, architectural space and the built environment from students and scholars working within all subject-areas across the Arts and Humanities. Papers should seek to address the creation, understanding, circulation and cultural impact of both re

CFP: Sonic Horror

Posted by Matt Foley on February 14, 2015 in Blog, News tagged with , ,

CFP: Sonic Horror “Shh—was that a voice?” Sound is arguably one of the most fear-provoking aspects of horror. Ghost stories and horror films employ sonic tropes such as creaking floor boards, sudden loud thumps, or ephemeral children’s choirs in order to enhance suspense through the evocation of unseen terror. “The spectre of sound”, as Kevin Donnelly has called it, creeps up on us dorsally, evading the relative comfort of visual recognition. Sonic horror tropes have also been used to imbue other genres, such as musical theatre and popular music, with elements of horror. Whethe

Review: The Night of the Zombie, The Circus of Horrors, Albert Halls, Stirling, February 1st, 2015 Thumbnail

Review: The Night of the Zombie, The Circus of Horrors, Albert Halls, Stirling, February 1st, 2015

Posted by Tanja Jurković on February 13, 2015 in Reviews tagged with , , ,

  The lights inside the venue suddenly went out. Darkness was holding each and every member of the audience in its strong grip. Vague shapes on the dark stage started to move, accompanied by unfamiliar noises that caused shivers going down my spine. All of a sudden a deep, howling and ominous voice started telling the story of terror that is about to happen in front of our eyes, the story of “a decrepit corpse ridden London, plagued by Zombies, a city ruled by the undead and climaxing in an awesome flaming apocalypse”. The Night of the Zombie has begun. Set in 2020, “the stor

PhD Studentship: Literature and Architecture, 1700–1850 Thumbnail

PhD Studentship: Literature and Architecture, 1700–1850

Posted by Dale Townshend on February 08, 2015 in News tagged with

UNIVERSITY OF STIRLING SCHOOL OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES FULLY-FUNDED DOCTORAL STUDENTSHIP: Literature and Architecture, 1700—1850. The School of Arts and Humanities is pleased to invite applications for this three-year, fully-funded PhD Studentship (fees and subsistence at current AHRC UK/EU rates). Funded by the University of Stirling, this studentship is designed to complement an AHRC Leadership Project entitled ‘Writing Britain’s Ruins, 1700-1850: The Architectural Imagination’. Led by Dale Townshend, and supported by post-Doctoral Fellow Dr Peter Li

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience Thumbnail

Fan Girls and Fangbangers: gender and the Gothic audience

Posted by Eva Hayles Gledhill on February 07, 2015 in Blog, Eva Hayles Gledhill tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Gothic became a self-parodying genre very quickly: Jane Austen wrote the self-reflexive Northanger Abbey in 1798, though it did not see publication for nearly twenty years after that. Two hundred years later, the gothic has expanded and adapted, and a mocking inter-textual awareness is a key quality for the popularity of the genre. The audience for this fiction has long been perceived as skewing feminine, as is recognized and critiqued in Austen’s work. The modern southern gothic of True Blood (2007-2014), and American gothic Supernatural (2005-ongoing), also recognize a majority female fan

Review: Contemporary Scottish Gothic: Mourning, Authenticity, and Tradition Thumbnail

Review: Contemporary Scottish Gothic: Mourning, Authenticity, and Tradition

Posted by Alexandra Campbell on February 06, 2015 in Alexandra Campbell tagged with , , , , , , ,

Contemporary Scottish Gothic: Mourning, Authenticity, and Tradition  By Timothy Baker  In 2001 Edinburgh University’s Polygon Press released a collection of short stories entitled Damage Land: New Scottish Gothic Fiction, bringing together stories from influential writers such as Ali Smith, Jackie Kay, John Burnside and Janice Galloway. Published barely three years after the establishment of a devolved Scottish Parliament in 1998 and appearing in the first breaths of the new millennium, the collection has been key in highlighting the pervasive nature of Gothic creative writing in Scotlan