The Dying Text: Learning from Scottish Gothic Thumbnail

The Dying Text: Learning from Scottish Gothic

Posted by Timothy C. Baker on April 27, 2015 in Guest Blog, Timothy Baker tagged with , , ,

While death is self-evidently a primary theme of Gothic in all its iterations, mourning is no less so. Ann Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho, for instance, ends with the following curious formulation: ‘And, if the weak hand, that has recorded this tale, has, by its scenes, beguiled the mourner of one hour of sorrow, or, by its moral, taught him to sustain it – the effort, however humble, has not been vain, nor is the writer unrewarded’ (p. 672). Reading a Gothic novel may be useful diversion, but it may just as much provide a model for mourning. Gothic teaches us something about our

The Horror of Memory: John Burnside’s Glister Thumbnail

The Horror of Memory: John Burnside’s Glister

Posted by Timothy C. Baker on April 20, 2015 in Guest Blog, Timothy Baker tagged with , , , ,

In Tentacles Longer Than Night, the recently-released third volume of his Horror of Philosophy series, Eugene Thacker offers a reading of horror novels as philosophy, arguing that ‘Perhaps genres such as the horror genre are interesting not because we can devise ingenious explanatory models for them, but because they cause us to question some of our most basic assumptions about the knowledge-production process itself, or about the hubris of living in the human-centric world in which we currently live’ (p. 11) The furthest extent of these horror texts is the supernatural horror novel centre

Welcome Friends:  Horror Podcasting’s overthrow of the Mobile, Private iPod. Thumbnail

Welcome Friends: Horror Podcasting’s overthrow of the Mobile, Private iPod.

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 16, 2015 in Danielle Hancock tagged with , , , , , , , ,

Camp-fire tales and oral spook-tales aren’t just about sharing voices, they are also about sharing space. Faintly-lit faces in the darkness, making strange the presence of other humans, crowded around a beacon of light: a rough-shod, impermanent domestic in the wilderness, with goodness knows what watching from the shadows. There’s a thrill to be had in probing the limitations of the firelight’s safety, and in the uncertainty of one’s company; transformed by the stories and their in/visibility. The same is true of fireside ghost-tales, and Golden Era radio-horror listening: the fam

Translating Experience: Under the Skin Thumbnail

Translating Experience: Under the Skin

Posted by Timothy C. Baker on April 13, 2015 in Guest Blog, Timothy Baker tagged with , ,

How we think about mourning, and how we consider our place in the world, is always in part a question of medium, of how our world is presented to us. There may be no better example of this than Michel Faber’s 2000 novel Under the Skin and Jonathan Glazer’s 2014 film version, scripted by Walter Campbell, specifically in the way they handle the question of animal. Faber’s novel has often been read as problematising binary oppositions between human and nonhuman animals. The novel depicts a group of aliens raising humans as meat on a farm near Inverness. By using ‘human’ to descri

Stars, Stripes, and Monsters Thumbnail

Stars, Stripes, and Monsters

Posted by Gabriel Eljaiek-Rodriguez on April 09, 2015 in Gabriel A. Eljaiek-Rodriguez, Uncategorized tagged with

What do Dracula and Godzilla have in common? What sounds like the beginning of a bad joke or a guiltily pleasurable “B movie” portraying the serendipitous encounter between two iconic monsters, is actually just a strange series of connections facilitated by two recent movies involving the characters: Godzilla (2014) by Gareth Edwards and Dracula Untold (2014) by Gary Shore. The two films are not thematically similar, neither through characters nor through plot; nevertheless, a potential point of contact is forged in regards to both the re-telling nature of the films (the two films posit th

Horror Podcasting: Cyber Folktales at the Digital Campfire Thumbnail

Horror Podcasting: Cyber Folktales at the Digital Campfire

Posted by Danielle Hancock on April 09, 2015 in Blog, Danielle Hancock tagged with , , , , ,

This is a blogpost about precisely what it cannot provide - a sense of sound, tone and rhythm; a lone voice to be shared with a group. So, for a moment, try to forget the page.   And listen with me.   Chords are struck on a banjo, a low voice tells a homespun tale, short but enthralling in its horror and simplicity; they assure us that this story is absolutely, one-hundred percent true, that it really happened to the teller, or his friend, or his friend’s friend; at the story’s close, those banjo notes return, alongside the invitation to tell your own creepy story, to listene

Conference, University of Hertfordshire, Sept 3rd-5th 2015: Extended Call for Papers and Panels Thumbnail

Conference, University of Hertfordshire, Sept 3rd-5th 2015: Extended Call for Papers and Panels

Posted by Matt Foley on April 08, 2015 in News tagged with , ,

OGOM: ‘The Company of Wolves’: Sociality, Animality, and Subjectivity in Literary and Cultural Narratives—Werewolves, Shapeshifters, and Feral Humans Wolves have long been the archetypal enemy of human company, preying on the unguarded boundaries of civilisation, threatening the pastoral of ideal sociality and figuring as sexual predators. Yet, in their way, with their complex pack interactions, they have served as a model for society. Lately, this ancient enemy has been rehabilitated and reappraised, and rewilding projects have attempted to admit them more closely into our lives. O

Scottish Gothic and the Work of Mourning Thumbnail

Scottish Gothic and the Work of Mourning

Posted by Timothy C. Baker on April 06, 2015 in Guest Blog, Timothy Baker tagged with , , ,

I came to studying Gothic, and especially Scottish Gothic, as a sceptic. While critics such as Ian Duncan have influentially argued that Scottish Gothic is centred around ‘an association between the national and the uncanny or supernatural’ (p. 70), David Punter argues first, in his 1999 article that serves as a foundation for the field, that the formulation must ‘remain under a certain erasure’ (p. 102) and later, in 2011, that he is no longer sure ‘what such a description might mean’ (p. 9). The idea of Scottish Gothic rests on two unsupportable, or at least shaky, presupposition

Carmilla Rising: Adapting Le Fanu’s Novella In the Age of Social Media Thumbnail

Carmilla Rising: Adapting Le Fanu’s Novella In the Age of Social Media

Posted by Matt Foley on March 30, 2015 in Blog, Reviews tagged with , ,

Carmilla Rising: Adapting Le Fanu’s Novella In the Age of Social Media  By Lauren Chochinov All roads lead to Bram Stoker’s Dracula, at least according to the British Library’s recent exhibition Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination. The path to Dracula is paved with early vampires, each providing important elements of what is, arguably, the most famous of all literary vampires. Thus the exhibition carefully detailed this journey, showing off its unparalleled collection of important literary treasures including the early vampire novel The Vampyre (1819) by John Polidori. Amongs

New Publication – Ann Radcliffe’s Observations during a Tour to the Lakes Thumbnail

New Publication – Ann Radcliffe’s Observations during a Tour to the Lakes

Posted by Dale Townshend on March 26, 2015 in News tagged with

Ann Radcliffe’s Observations during a Tour to the Lakes of Lancashire, Westmoreland, and Cumberland, edited by Penny Bradshaw (Bookcase: Carlisle, 2014). In 1794 the Gothic novelist, Ann Radcliffe, set out on a tour of the Lake District and the following year she published an account of her experience as Observations during a Tour to the Lakes. This account of the Lakes is shaped by Radcliffe’s distinctive literary style and imaginative perspectives as well as by the turbulent political climate of these years, and represents an important stepping-stone in the journey from pictu