The Shock and Horror Picture Show: Étienne-Gaspard Robertson and the 19th-century phantasmagoria Thumbnail

The Shock and Horror Picture Show: Étienne-Gaspard Robertson and the 19th-century phantasmagoria

Posted by Lynn Shepherd on October 31, 2014 in Blog, Lynn Shepherd tagged with , , , ,

The first time I had a sense of what a 19th-century phantasmagoria would really have been like was the Gothic Nightmares show at Tate Britain in 2006, which included not only Fuseli’s iconic Nightmare, but a special darkened room with a slide show projected on the walls, and suitably ghastly sound effects. That experience stayed with me, and when I came to write The Pierced Heart, it was the inspiration for the second of the two narratives in the book, in which the narrator is a young girl called Lucy, the daughter and assistant to the proprietor of a famous phantasmagoria show. My ‘Pro

Fictions of Corporeal Diversity: A Symposium on Literary Disability Studies Thumbnail

Fictions of Corporeal Diversity: A Symposium on Literary Disability Studies

Posted by Matt Foley on October 30, 2014 in Blog, News tagged with ,

Fictions of Corporeal Diversity: A Symposium on Literary Disability Studies Lancaster University a.gregory5@lancaster.ac.uk Charles Carter Building, Lancaster University Thursday 4th June 2015 Keynote Speaker: David Bolt (Liverpool Hope University)   In ‘Literary Disability Studies: The Long Awaited Response’ (2007), David Bolt illustrated the absence of critical work on disability in literary studies. The subsequent establishment of The Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, in addition to the continuing expansion of the University of Mich

‘Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination’ at the British LIbrary Thumbnail

‘Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination’ at the British LIbrary

Posted by Dale Townshend on October 29, 2014 in Uncategorized tagged with

Terror and Wonder, the UK’s largest exhibition of Gothic literature, opens at the British Library Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination runs from 3 October 2014 to 20 January 2015 Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination opens at the British Library exploring Gothic culture’s roots in British literature and celebrating 250 years since the publication of the first Gothic novel. Alongside the manuscripts of classic novels such as Frankenstein, Dracula and Jane Eyre, the exhibition brings the dark and macabre to life with artefacts, old and new. Highlights of the exhibition incl

Youth and Young Manhood, Male Anxiety in Palo Alto Thumbnail

Youth and Young Manhood, Male Anxiety in Palo Alto

Posted by Liam Dodds on October 23, 2014 in Blog tagged with , , , , , , ,

"There’s a part of me that’s like that, and it’s a part that I keep so hidden," he said. "So basically that role was almost liberating. It was finding this part of myself that needs a ton of attention that I usually keep hidden and bringing it out to the front" - Nat Wolff What does it mean to be a modern man? In the face of decades of increasing marginalisation, the concurrent rise of political correctness, and an overt and overly-prescriptive consumerist agenda – where men were told what to wear, how to act, but most importantly, what to suppress – Fight Club sought to respond 

Gothic Manchester 2014 Thumbnail

Gothic Manchester 2014

Posted by Xavier Aldana Reyes on October 21, 2014 in News tagged with , , ,

Following the phenomenal success of the Gothic Manchester Festival 2013, which launched the Manchester Centre for Gothic Studies, the city-wide festival is back with a new programme of events and activities designed to showcase MMU’s academic expertise in the gothic and foreground Manchester’s rich vein of gothic talent. Included in this festival of the macabre and fantastical are readings from authors working on the gothic dimensions of austerity politics, tours of the John Rylands Library and of the gothic splendours of the city and author Rosie Garland reading from both of her nove

Course on Gothic Cinema at the Cornerhouse and Related Public Screenings Thumbnail

Course on Gothic Cinema at the Cornerhouse and Related Public Screenings

Posted by Xavier Aldana Reyes on October 21, 2014 in News tagged with , , , , , ,

Over the months of October, November and December, the Manchester Centre for Gothic Studies will be running a beginner's course on Gothic Cinema in partnership with the Cornerhouse. In connection, there will be a couple of major screenings, of the films Rebecca (1940) and Elephant Man (1980), which are open to all members of the public. The times are: Wed 29 Oct, 18:15 – Rebecca (Alfred Hitchcock/US 1940/131 mins/PG) Wed 19 Nov, 18:15 – The Elephant Man (David Lynch/GB 1980/124 mins/PG) Although tickets for the course have now sold out, you can still download the course out

Waking the (un)dead: Myths, monsters, and remaking a classic text Thumbnail

Waking the (un)dead: Myths, monsters, and remaking a classic text

Posted by Lynn Shepherd on October 21, 2014 in Blog, Lynn Shepherd tagged with , , , , , , ,

When I published Murder at Mansfield Park in 2010 I did an interview about it on BBC radio, and I remember the almost breathless awe in the interviewer’s voice as she said, “This is your first novel, and you’re trying to write like Jane Austen?” Amazing though it may sound, that was the first time that it really came home to me what a mountainous task I’d set myself. Though I’d been under no illusions about how some readers might react to the idea of turning an Austen masterpiece into a murder mystery – there will always be some people who regard classic texts as sacred cows, nev

Crowdfunding Poe: the nEvermore! anthology Thumbnail

Crowdfunding Poe: the nEvermore! anthology

Posted by Matt Foley on October 15, 2014 in News, Uncategorized tagged with , ,

Crowdfunding Poe! by Nancy Kilpatrick     Writers come and go and few are remembered by the general population 165 years after their death. Most writers would be happy to be even a footnote in an academic paper. For the general population, Edgar Allan Poe's name and work have endured. Say "Nevermore" and the reference is instantly understood. Caro Soles and I are both enamored with Poe's work and wanted to create an anthology that allowed today's writers to honor Poe by writing mysteries with a supernatural element, or dark fantasy/horror stories with a touch of myster

The Death of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl Thumbnail

The Death of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl

Posted by Liam Dodds on October 13, 2014 in Blog tagged with , , , , ,

The books don’t matter. Accordingly, I had not read Gillian Flynn's Gone Girl before I took my seat in the feted darkness of Edinburgh’s improbable and implausible Omni Centre. I had, however, briefly perused the novel’s Wikipedia article just so that, in the darkness, I could smirk my semi-knowing smirk in a pathetic show of one-upmanship over the twenty other people in the world who hadn’t read the novel as that twist was portrayed in beautiful, splendid Technicolor. I say twist. The old-timey Village actually set in the present day, the strange otherworldliness of a post-apocal

Review: The Cambridge Companion to Sensation Fiction Thumbnail

Review: The Cambridge Companion to Sensation Fiction

Posted by Fern Pullan on October 09, 2014 in Blog, Fern Pullan, Reviews tagged with , , , , ,

Mangham, Andrew (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to Sensation Fiction. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. 2013 first edition paperback. 978-0-521-15709-4, 253pp. £18.99 www.cambridge.org Mangham’s Companion of fifteen essays is a highly refreshing study of the sensation fiction genre, highlighted by his introduction to the volume and his unwillingness to commit to a concrete time frame for the genre. He demonstrates the difficulties in defining sensation fiction at the same time as acknowledging the text that is generally accepted as being the progenitor of the genre: What