Review: IGA 2017 Thumbnail

Review: IGA 2017

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 02, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

A Review of the 13th Biennial Conference of the International Gothic Association: Gothic Traditions and Departures Co-authored by Harriet Fletcher and Sophie Raine   In July of this year, we had the privilege of attending the 13th Biennial IGA conference held at the Universidad de las Américas Puebla (UDLAP) in Cholula, Mexico. The conference exceeded all of our expectations in terms of academic engagement, innovative research, and support from the IGA community as a whole.   Opening Ceremony and Wine Reception The first day began with the opening addresses from t

Review: The Gothic in Text Matters Thumbnail

Review: The Gothic in Text Matters

Posted by Timothy Jones on October 02, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with ,

Text Matters, A Journal of Literature Theory and Culture, Gothic Matters, (Łódź: Łódź University Press, No. 6, 2016) Review by Stuart Lindsay In which ways today does the Gothic matter? Gothic matters is the central issue of the collection of essays in this, most recent, issue of Text Matters, edited by Agnieszka Soltysik Monnet. Its authors are concerned with both definitions of Gothic matters: firstly, its diverse content, and its proliferation across and cross-pollination with other literary genres, styles, cultures, and contemporary social contexts; secondly, as Monnet writes i

Ray Bradbury Centre fundraiser Thumbnail

Ray Bradbury Centre fundraiser

Posted by Timothy Jones on August 25, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with

The Ray Bradbury Centre has put out a call for funding to help with preservation work in their archive: https://iufoundation.fundly.com/preservingtheworldofraybradbury Bradbury, as well as being one of the last's century's most read science fiction authors, also made huge contributions to weird and Gothic fiction.

International Gothic Association Prizes and News Thumbnail

International Gothic Association Prizes and News

Posted by Timothy Jones on August 25, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with

The recent IGA conference in Cholula, Mexico was, by all accounts a wonderful event, and the association is now gearing up for two conferences in the next two years - Manchester Metropolitan in 2018, and, for the first time in the United States in 2019, at Lewis University. At the conference, the Allan Lloyd Smith Memorial Prize for Gothic Criticism was announced - the co-winners were Marie Mulvey-Roberts for Dangerous Bodies: Historicising the Gothic Corporeal (Manchester UP), and Timothy Jones for for The Gothic and the Carnivalesque in American Culture (U of Wales P). The IGA also an

CfP: Horror Studies – Online Horror and Narrative Networks Thumbnail

CfP: Horror Studies – Online Horror and Narrative Networks

Posted by Timothy Jones on June 29, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with

There's a special issue of Horror Studies with a cfp out at the moment -   Horror Studies - Special Issue - Spineless: Online Horror and Narrative Networks Deadline for submissions: August 15, 2017 Contact email: tstuart9@uwo.ca With the current spate of contemporary high-budget properties that have sought to engage and adapt online horror content, increasing attention has been turned to communities of amateur critics, writers, illustrators, and fans that work to create horror in digital space. Their influe

“Into the Moving Unquiet Depths”: Dreams and the Unconscious in Rebecca (1938) Thumbnail

“Into the Moving Unquiet Depths”: Dreams and the Unconscious in Rebecca (1938)

Posted by Pam Sherman on June 16, 2017 in Blog, Pamela Sherman tagged with , , , ,

This blog series has chiefly been concerned with investigating the narrator's fight to establish her own identity in Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca. The second Mrs. de Winter's almost morbid fascination with Rebecca as a model of the perfect wife, coupled with Mrs. Danvers' cruel treatment and Maxim's refusal to regard his wife as an adult are all contributing factors to the narrator's struggles. However, when the mystery surrounding Rebecca is dispelled and Maxim reveals his crime, a change takes place in the narrator. Far from being surprised by her husband's propensity for murder, she list

Infantilizing the Narrator: The Husband as Father in Rebecca (1938) Thumbnail

Infantilizing the Narrator: The Husband as Father in Rebecca (1938)

Posted by Pam Sherman on June 09, 2017 in Blog, Pamela Sherman tagged with , , ,

In my last post, female identity in Rebecca was discussed and the narrator's goal of being a good wife as an ideal ego, Rebecca as the ego ideal, and Mrs. Danvers as a superego that attempts to tear down the narrator at every turn were established. This week, we will take a look at Maxim's part in the narrator's struggles with identity. Through his infantilization of the second Mrs. de Winter and attempts to protect her innocence, it becomes apparent that Maxim also performs a superego-like function by preventing her from fully embracing her role as a wife. From the moment that they bec

In Rebecca’s Shadow: Female Identity in Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca (1938) Thumbnail

In Rebecca’s Shadow: Female Identity in Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca (1938)

Posted by Pam Sherman on June 02, 2017 in Blog, Pamela Sherman tagged with , , , ,

Ellen Moers first coined the term "Female Gothic" to simply refer to Gothic texts written by women. Since then, the field of Female Gothic has expanded to include issues relating to women in these texts, including anxieties surrounding identity and entrapment. Patricia Murphy makes a distinction between Female Gothic of eighteenth and nineteenth century novels, and what she calls New Woman Gothic. She argues that, in earlier texts, "the period preceding marriage typically is fraught with Gothic difficulties such as entrapment whereas, in the latter texts, marriage itself becomes the horrif

All hail Final Girls! Review of The Monster (2016, Bertino) Thumbnail

All hail Final Girls! Review of The Monster (2016, Bertino)

Posted by Tanja Jurković on May 26, 2017 in Reviews, Tanja Jurkovic tagged with

  Usually when I need some sort of inspiration, I find a list of movies and randomly choose one based on the movie’s cover. I am using that somewhat overrated approach: if the cover looks good then it must be good! Of course, that is not always the case. Nevertheless, in the case of The Monster (2016, Bertino), it was. It was good. And quite enjoyable.  The film starts with a story of a divorced young mother (Zoe Kezino) and her preadolescent daughter (Ella Ballentine), who seems to have all the bad luck in her young life. She is not a child, she is forced

Fantasy, Fairy Tales and the (Non) Human – Seminar Thumbnail

Fantasy, Fairy Tales and the (Non) Human – Seminar

Posted by Timothy Jones on May 19, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

There's a really interesting looking seminar being organised by the University of Edinburgh's School of Literatures, Languages and Cultures, which could be of interest  - Fantasy, Fairy Tales and the (Non) Human 28th June 2017 2.00-5.00 50 George Square 2.03 Keynote: John Plotz (Brandeis University) ‘World Without Us: The Problem of the Nonhuman in fin-de-siècle Fantasy’ With: Sarah Dunnigan (University of Edinburgh) 'Transfigurations: Hogg and the Spiritualised Fairy Tale' Rebecca Langworthy (University of Aberdeen) ‘The Tales at the Heart of the Tale: Scottish S