CfP: Horror Studies – Online Horror and Narrative Networks Thumbnail

CfP: Horror Studies – Online Horror and Narrative Networks

Posted by Timothy Jones on June 29, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with

There's a special issue of Horror Studies with a cfp out at the moment -   Horror Studies - Special Issue - Spineless: Online Horror and Narrative Networks Deadline for submissions: August 15, 2017 Contact email: tstuart9@uwo.ca With the current spate of contemporary high-budget properties that have sought to engage and adapt online horror content, increasing attention has been turned to communities of amateur critics, writers, illustrators, and fans that work to create horror in digital space. Their influe

“Into the Moving Unquiet Depths”: Dreams and the Unconscious in Rebecca (1938) Thumbnail

“Into the Moving Unquiet Depths”: Dreams and the Unconscious in Rebecca (1938)

Posted by Pam Sherman on June 16, 2017 in Blog, Pamela Sherman tagged with , , , ,

This blog series has chiefly been concerned with investigating the narrator's fight to establish her own identity in Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca. The second Mrs. de Winter's almost morbid fascination with Rebecca as a model of the perfect wife, coupled with Mrs. Danvers' cruel treatment and Maxim's refusal to regard his wife as an adult are all contributing factors to the narrator's struggles. However, when the mystery surrounding Rebecca is dispelled and Maxim reveals his crime, a change takes place in the narrator. Far from being surprised by her husband's propensity for murder, she list

Infantilizing the Narrator: The Husband as Father in Rebecca (1938) Thumbnail

Infantilizing the Narrator: The Husband as Father in Rebecca (1938)

Posted by Pam Sherman on June 09, 2017 in Blog, Pamela Sherman tagged with , , ,

In my last post, female identity in Rebecca was discussed and the narrator's goal of being a good wife as an ideal ego, Rebecca as the ego ideal, and Mrs. Danvers as a superego that attempts to tear down the narrator at every turn were established. This week, we will take a look at Maxim's part in the narrator's struggles with identity. Through his infantilization of the second Mrs. de Winter and attempts to protect her innocence, it becomes apparent that Maxim also performs a superego-like function by preventing her from fully embracing her role as a wife. From the moment that they bec

In Rebecca’s Shadow: Female Identity in Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca (1938) Thumbnail

In Rebecca’s Shadow: Female Identity in Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca (1938)

Posted by Pam Sherman on June 02, 2017 in Blog, Pamela Sherman tagged with , , , ,

Ellen Moers first coined the term "Female Gothic" to simply refer to Gothic texts written by women. Since then, the field of Female Gothic has expanded to include issues relating to women in these texts, including anxieties surrounding identity and entrapment. Patricia Murphy makes a distinction between Female Gothic of eighteenth and nineteenth century novels, and what she calls New Woman Gothic. She argues that, in earlier texts, "the period preceding marriage typically is fraught with Gothic difficulties such as entrapment whereas, in the latter texts, marriage itself becomes the horrif

All hail Final Girls! Review of The Monster (2016, Bertino) Thumbnail

All hail Final Girls! Review of The Monster (2016, Bertino)

Posted by Tanja Jurković on May 26, 2017 in Reviews, Tanja Jurkovic tagged with

  Usually when I need some sort of inspiration, I find a list of movies and randomly choose one based on the movie’s cover. I am using that somewhat overrated approach: if the cover looks good then it must be good! Of course, that is not always the case. Nevertheless, in the case of The Monster (2016, Bertino), it was. It was good. And quite enjoyable.  The film starts with a story of a divorced young mother (Zoe Kezino) and her preadolescent daughter (Ella Ballentine), who seems to have all the bad luck in her young life. She is not a child, she is forced

Fantasy, Fairy Tales and the (Non) Human – Seminar Thumbnail

Fantasy, Fairy Tales and the (Non) Human – Seminar

Posted by Timothy Jones on May 19, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

There's a really interesting looking seminar being organised by the University of Edinburgh's School of Literatures, Languages and Cultures, which could be of interest  - Fantasy, Fairy Tales and the (Non) Human 28th June 2017 2.00-5.00 50 George Square 2.03 Keynote: John Plotz (Brandeis University) ‘World Without Us: The Problem of the Nonhuman in fin-de-siècle Fantasy’ With: Sarah Dunnigan (University of Edinburgh) 'Transfigurations: Hogg and the Spiritualised Fairy Tale' Rebecca Langworthy (University of Aberdeen) ‘The Tales at the Heart of the Tale: Scottish S

Marvin Macy: The Strong Man of Grotesque Power and Heteronormativity Thumbnail

Marvin Macy: The Strong Man of Grotesque Power and Heteronormativity

Posted by Rachel Carden on May 19, 2017 in Blog, Rachel Carden tagged with , , , , ,

In my previous blog, I established Miss Amelia’s café as a place of inclusive community, linked to Mikhail Bakhtin’s conceptualisation of carnivals and their connection to freak shows. I highlighted that the space engendered a sense of community where its occupants’ grotesque physicality and their subversive genders were accepted. This post explores the grotesque power of patriarchy using Foucauldian theory and its resistance to the collapse of dichotomous gender and sexuality binaries in Carson McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951). Justin Edwards and Rune Graulund, i

Review: Contemporary Spanish Gothic Thumbnail

Review: Contemporary Spanish Gothic

Posted by Timothy Jones on May 16, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with

Contemporary Spanish Gothic: A Review Davies, Ann. Contemporary Spanish Gothic. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2016. Reviewed by Rocío Rødtjer   In the article ‘Madrid Has Died’, the author laments that: Madrid has died, like Vienna, Saint Petersburg, Lisbon and Constantinople. There are no longer populations, but one population built or modified according to the layout of Paris and distributed throughout the globe in copies of different sizes Were it not for the disappearance of Constantinople, such an archetypical elegy on the homogenising effects of urba

A Strong Man, a Hermaphrodite and a Hunchbacked Dwarf Walk into a Café: Carnival and Community in McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951) Thumbnail

A Strong Man, a Hermaphrodite and a Hunchbacked Dwarf Walk into a Café: Carnival and Community in McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café (1951)

Posted by Rachel Carden on May 12, 2017 in Blog, Rachel Carden tagged with , , , ,

In my previous blog, I summarised the plot of McCullers’ The Ballad of the Sad Café and aligned it with key genres and tropes to highlight its Gothicism and cultural critique of patriarchy through grotesque tropes. This post uses Bakhtinian theory to situate Miss Amelia’s café as a place of community, a theatrical space of gender performance and bodily oddities, which temporarily succeeds in challenging patriarchy.   The philosopher and literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin’s Rabelais and His world (1965) analyses the work of the Renaissance writer François Rabelais to refocu

Reminder: Gothic Modernisms Thumbnail

Reminder: Gothic Modernisms

Posted by Timothy Jones on May 09, 2017 in Uncategorized tagged with ,

A reminder of the forthcoming Gothic Modernisms Conference in June - looks wonderful.   GOTHIC MODERNISMS International Conference: Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, 29-30 June 2017   REGISTRATION NOW OPEN   GOTHIC MODERNISMS: 29 & 30 June, 2017, The Rijksmuseum: A two-day international conference exploring legacies, histories and contested identities of European Gothic/early-modern visual cultures in (global) modernity, in particular in contexts of new fin-de-siècle cultural modernities, modernism, avant-gardes, nationalisms and cosmopolitanisms. More informatio