Dread Falls Theatre’s Father Dagon Embodies Lovecraftian Fear Thumbnail

Dread Falls Theatre’s Father Dagon Embodies Lovecraftian Fear

Posted by Will Connor on July 29, 2014 in Blog, Will Connor tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,

          H. P. Lovecraft is arguably one of the most important writers of the previous century and remains so today. His works, spanning horror, science fiction, and fantasy, have influenced a large number of prominent authors following fellow writer and fan August Derleth’s adamant insistence that Lovecraft’s works be preserved and widely published. As a result, many tributes, expansions, and interpretations of Lovecraft’s works have been produced in increasing numbers each year to date. Literature is not the only form of media producing Lovecraftian works, either, with the most c

Gothic Networking Day at MMU: a review Thumbnail

Gothic Networking Day at MMU: a review

Posted by rebeccaduncan on July 16, 2014 in News tagged with , , , ,

At about quarter past nine on Saturday 12 July, Shannon Rollins (currently writing an excellent blog series on Steampunk for the International Gothic Association – check it out here: http://www.iga.stir.ac.uk/showblog.php?id=169) and I were walking through Manchester Metropolitan University on our way to the Gothic networking day organised by Linnie Blake and Xavier Aldana Reyes. A group of people had gathered outside the doors to the business school. ‘Is this it?’ I asked. ‘Don’t think so,’ Shannon replied. ‘Not wearing enough black.’ This is one of the things I like about th

Review: “We’re All Infected” Essays on AMC’s The Walking Dead and the Fate of the Human – edited by Dawn Keetley Thumbnail

Review: “We’re All Infected” Essays on AMC’s The Walking Dead and the Fate of the Human – edited by Dawn Keetley

Posted by Kelly Gardner on July 02, 2014 in Reviews tagged with , , ,

  McFarland are adding to their already growing collection of Zombie oriented publications with the recently released “We’re All Infected” Essays on AMC’s The Walking Dead and the Fate of the Human edited by Dawn Keetley.   This edited collection of thirteen original scholarly essays, exhibits a clear sense of structural coherence and critical timeliness. The use of The Walking Dead television series (as well as references to Kirkman’s comic book series) as the central focus of the collection functions as a cohesive theme from which various explorations may div

Real Vampire Research Thumbnail

Real Vampire Research

Posted by Emyr Williams on June 11, 2014 in Dr Emyr Williams, Guest Blog tagged with , ,

    Hi all,   My name is Dr Emyr Williams, I am a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Glyndwr University.  One of my research interests is 'real' vampires, those people who live a vampire-like lifestyle.  At present I am collecting responses from real vampires in order to better understand their personality, self-esteem and world-views.  Would be happy to talk more about this and other topics with you all.   I am fairly new to blogging, so forgive me if this takes a while. E :)

GRISLY, a film from BlueShirtsBrown Productions Thumbnail

GRISLY, a film from BlueShirtsBrown Productions

Posted by Dale Townshend on June 10, 2014 in News tagged with

BlueShirtsBrown Productions would like to introduce readers of the Gothic Imagination to the sci-fi/horror short-film GRISLY, a story about a young mutated woman who is captured by a black ops agency, and her only hope for survival is a lone CIA Agent who can look past her mutations and see her humanity. The story pays homage to both comic books and the b-movies of the 1950s, such as The Creature from the Black Lagoon. GRISLY recently launched a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter, and they're reaching out to potential supporters like yourself. The link below is a quick and easy way to sup

Coming Soon: New Digital Editions of Victorian Penny Dreadfuls Thumbnail

Coming Soon: New Digital Editions of Victorian Penny Dreadfuls

Posted by Dale Townshend on June 10, 2014 in News tagged with

Serialized Victorian Gothic pulp fiction for the discerning modern reader! Hic Dragones is pleased to announce a new series of eBook editions of Victorian penny bloods and penny dreadfuls. Digitally remastered and reserialized, these editions are intended to introduce modern readers to the thrills, shocks and cliffhangers of classic blood-curdling tales. Penny dreadfuls have a significant place in the modern imagination and affections, but they are rarely read in the twenty-first century. And this is hardly surprising—with only a few exceptions, these texts can only be foun

Gothic Networking Day Thumbnail

Gothic Networking Day

Posted by Xavier Aldana Reyes on June 10, 2014 in News tagged with , , ,

The Gothic Networking Day gives postgraduate students and those working in the gothic a unique opportunity to learn about Gothic Studies in the United Kingdom – from some of its major figures. The day will include talks from the Co-President of the International Gothic Association, the Editor of the prestigious journal Gothic Studies, the Editors of the Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies,  and the Editor of the University of Wales Gothic Studies Series. Representatives from Twisted Tales and Grimmfest Film Festival will illustrate possibilities for public engagement work and educa

Experiencing the body: a transdisciplinary approach to Stephen King’s Thinner (1984) Thumbnail

Experiencing the body: a transdisciplinary approach to Stephen King’s Thinner (1984)

Posted by Jessica Folio on May 29, 2014 in Dr Jessica Folio, Guest Blog tagged with

As I was listening thoroughly to the three artists Amanda Couch, Mindy Lee and Andrew Hladky circumvoluting over their personal corporeal experience in their group presentation suggestively untitled “On Entrails and Performances” delivered on the occasion of the “Body Horror/ Shapeshifters” conference held in Athens in November 2013, as I was integrating their critical perception of the digestion process through food and language and as I was pondering over the “spatter platter” (fig.1) quality of their puzzling works of art, a connexion with Stephen King’s Thinner emerged in

Stephen King’s Kaleidoscopic Work Thumbnail

Stephen King’s Kaleidoscopic Work

Posted by Jessica Folio on May 18, 2014 in Dr Jessica Folio, Guest Blog tagged with

"In anything fit to be called by the name of reading, the process itself should be absorbing and voluptuous; we should gloat over a book, be rapt clean out of ourselves, and rise from the peruse, our mind filled with the busiest, kaleidoscopic dance of images [...]."[1] Kaleidoscopic: such is the way I have aimed to envision King’s narratives, a multiplicity of viewpoints and interpretations offered to the readers to lead them in a transfixing danse macabre. In his essay, “The Literature of Exhaustion,” John Barth has pointed out thatthe conventional modes of literary represent

The Monster in the Labyrinth: Clive Barker’s “The Madonna.” Thumbnail

The Monster in the Labyrinth: Clive Barker’s “The Madonna.”

Posted by Jessica Folio on May 18, 2014 in Dr Jessica Folio, Guest Blog tagged with

At the image of a labyrinth, Clive Barker’s Books of Blood (1984-85) unveil a set of intricate and disruptive short    stories weaved with the red threads of corporeal materiality and the monstrosisation of the body. A labyrinth is “a structure consisting of a number of intercommunicative passages arranged in bewildering complexity, through which it is difficult or impossible to find one’s way without guidance” (Simpson 564). Being one element of initiation in Greek mythology, the labyrinth is associated with its creator, Daedalus, with the monstrous Minotaur hiding at its centre